Welcome to the Fall ’19 Semester

Welcome to all! We’re happy to kick off the Fall semester on Monday, August 26th.

If you’re an American Studies or History major working on a thesis this fall, we’ll be hosting a meeting at 5:00 on Monday (8/26) in Monroe 210. Dr. Claudine Ferrell will share information and tips for preparation and success. Planning on a thesis for the spring and want to learn more? Feel free to join the meeting.

Stay tuned for more info on our fall Talking History speaker series!

 

History and American Studies Symposium–April 26, 2019

 

History and American Studies Symposium 

University of Mary Washington – Department of History and American Studies
Friday, April 26, 2019

 

SESSION ONE. 9 AM. Monroe 210—Fashion, Feminism, and Female Quakers

Moderator: Dr. Claudine Ferrell

Allison McCrumb, “Fashion in the Confederacy during the Civil War: A Case Study of Richmond”

Kira Lampani-McElfresh, “Feminism in the National Florence Crittenton Mission, 1883-1930”

Maddie Coughlin, “Eighteenth-Century Female Quaker Ministers and Colonial Quaker Women’s Culture”

[Read more…]

Two Carol Berkin events tomorrow!

UMW History and American Studies is excited and honored to be sponsoring a visit Carol Berkin tomorrow.  Our second Talking History of the semester will be with Dr. Berkin at 12:30 PM, in Lee 412.  And in addition to Talking History, she will be delivering the James Monroe Museum’s Women’s History Month lecture next week.  Her lecture, entitled “There is No Sex in Soul,” will be 7 to 8:30 PM, in Monroe Hall Room 116.  This lecture will discuss Judith Sargent Murray, whose Gleaner Essays were among the first defenses of women’s intellectual equality in the new republic.

Dr. Carol Berkin, historian and Presidential Professor of American Colonial and Revolutionary History and Women’s History at Baruch College, specializes in women’s roles in American colonial history.  She is the author, editor, or co-editor of 14 books, including Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for American Independence (Knopf, 2005); A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution (Harcourt 2002), a 2002 History Book Club Selection awarded the Colonial Dames of America Book Prize in 2004; and Jonathan Sewall: Odyssey of an American Loyalist (Columbia University Press, 1974), nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.  In addition to teaching and writing, Berkin has been a consultant for many televised historical documentaries appearing on A&E, C-SPAN, History Channel, and PBS.  She is the recipient of numerous professional awards recognizing her work as an historian and an educator.  Berkin received holds an AB from Barnard College and MA from Columbia University.  She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University, receiving the Bancroft Award for Outstanding Dissertation.

Seniors: 485 Meeting on Monday, January 14th

FURTHER UPDATE: the mandatory 485 information session has been rescheduled for Wednesday, January 16 at 4:00 PM in Monroe 210. See you there!

UPDATE: the 485 meeting has been CANCELED due to snow.  Stay tuned for information about when it will be rescheduled.

To all senior History and American Studies majors enrolled (or planning to enroll) in History 485 or American Studies 485 this spring: there will be a MANDATORY information session on Monday, January 14 at 5:00 PM in Monroe 210.  See you there, and welcome back!

Moscow and Washington Lecture Series: Andrew Friedman, November 27

The Department of History and American Studies is pleased to announce the fourth and final lecture of the Fall 2018 lecture series, “Washington and Moscow: Capitals of the Cold War Past and Present?” Prof. Andrew Friedman (Haverford College) will present his lecture, “Covert Capital: U.S. Empire, Northern Virginia and the Suburban Cold War.”

Abstract: The capital of the U.S. empire in the Cold War was not a city. It was an American suburb. This talk chronicles how the CIA and other national security institutions created a U.S. imperial home front in the suburbs of Northern Virginia after World War II, anchoring a new imperial culture and social world, and making U.S. geopolitics through the routines and spaces of everyday suburban life.

The lecture is open to the public and will be held Tuesday, November 27, 6pm in Monroe 346. Professor Friedman is author of Covert Capital: Landscapes of Denial and the Making of U.S. Empire in the Suburbs of Northern Virginia (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013).

Stephen Bittner–November 6, 6pm, Monroe 346

The Department of History and American Studies is pleased to announce the third lecture of the Fall 2018 lecture series, “Washington and Moscow: Capitals of the Cold War Past and Present?” Dr. Stephen Bittner (Sonoma State University) will present his lecture, “Soviet Dissidence, the Moscow Intelligentsia, and the Cold War.” The lecture is open to the public and will be held Tuesday, November 6, 6pm in Monroe 346.

Dr. George Derek Musgrove–October 23

The Department of History and American Studies at UMW is pleased to announce the second event of the fall 2018 lecture series, “Washington and Moscow: Capitals of the Cold War Past and Present?” Dr. George Derek Musgrove (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) will present his lecture, “‘We are headed for some bad trouble’: Gentrification and Displacement in Washington, D.C., 1920s-2018.” The lecture is open to the public and will be held Tuesday, October 23, 6pm in Monroe 346.