Professor Steven Harris Awarded NEH Summer Stipend

History Professor Steven E. Harris received a summer stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to complete research on his book project, “Flying Aeroflot: A History of the Soviet Union in the Jet Age.” He will conduct this research in summer 2021.

Like many faculty here at UMW, Professor Harris draws upon his scholarly research to develop innovative courses—in this case, the upper-level seminar, “Empires of the Air: Histories of Aviation and Space in the Modern World.” To be taught again in spring 2021, this course examines the history of flight from ballooning in the 18th century to the privatization of space exploration in the 21st. Along the way, students explore the impact of aeronautics and astronautics on global politics and warfare; gender, class, and race relations; imperial and national identities; and popular culture, travel, and commerce.

Professor Harris’s ‘Flying Aeroflot’ project uses commercial aviation to rethink how Soviet state and society evolved from the end of World War II to the communist system’s collapse in 1991. Aeroflot’s dramatic growth from an undeveloped sector under Stalin to the ‘world’s largest airline’ under Brezhnev tells the broader but still little understood story of the Soviet Union’s postwar transformation from an inward-looking terror state focused on industrial production to a superpower that wagered its legitimacy on fulfilling consumer needs at home and establishing a formidable global presence abroad.

By examining Aeroflot as a microcosm of the Soviet system, Harris’s project explains the country’s broader, sustained growth in the postwar era as the result of the state’s successful attempts to create a consumer-oriented, but not consumer-driven economy, propelled by technological development, global expansion, and the legitimizing discourse of Marxist-Leninist ideology.

Image: “Time is What I Gain: A Day by Train or an Hour by Plane” (Aeroflot poster, 1961) Source: Gleb Kotov, ed., Istoriia v plakatakh Aeroflota: K 85-letiiu grazhdanskoi aviatsii Rossii—dniu Aeroflota (Moscow: Aeroflot, 2008), 87.

Sarah Pietrowski Earns National Phi Alpha Theta Award


The Department of History and American Studies is delighted to announce that Sarah Pietrowski has earned the national Phi Alpha Theta Undergraduate Scholarship award.

This award is granted for excellence in scholarship to competing History majors in their senior year, along with a $1,000 scholarship to accompany it.

We are happy to cheer Sarah and celebrate her success!

Book Talk – Black History Month Speaker: Dr. Richard Bell

 

Dr. Richard Bell —

“The Reverse Underground Railroad: Slavery and Kidnapping in Pre-Civil War America”

– A talk based on his book Stolen

Tonight, 2/26, 7 pm, Lee Hall 441

All are welcome!

Talking History with Dr. Richard Bell – Today at Noon!


Talking History
with
Dr. Richard Bell,
“Doing Microhistory”

Today (2/26), noon, Monroe 210

Join the Department of History and American Studies as we gather for informal conversations with working historians about their ongoing research. For more information, contact edevlin@umw.edu.

Welcome to the Fall ’19 Semester

Welcome to all! We’re happy to kick off the Fall semester on Monday, August 26th.

If you’re an American Studies or History major working on a thesis this fall, we’ll be hosting a meeting at 5:00 on Monday (8/26) in Monroe 210. Dr. Claudine Ferrell will share information and tips for preparation and success. Planning on a thesis for the spring and want to learn more? Feel free to join the meeting.

Stay tuned for more info on our fall Talking History speaker series!

 

History and American Studies Symposium–April 26, 2019

 

History and American Studies Symposium 

University of Mary Washington – Department of History and American Studies
Friday, April 26, 2019

 

SESSION ONE. 9 AM. Monroe 210—Fashion, Feminism, and Female Quakers

Moderator: Dr. Claudine Ferrell

Allison McCrumb, “Fashion in the Confederacy during the Civil War: A Case Study of Richmond”

Kira Lampani-McElfresh, “Feminism in the National Florence Crittenton Mission, 1883-1930”

Maddie Coughlin, “Eighteenth-Century Female Quaker Ministers and Colonial Quaker Women’s Culture”

[Read more…]

Two Carol Berkin events tomorrow!

UMW History and American Studies is excited and honored to be sponsoring a visit Carol Berkin tomorrow.  Our second Talking History of the semester will be with Dr. Berkin at 12:30 PM, in Lee 412.  And in addition to Talking History, she will be delivering the James Monroe Museum’s Women’s History Month lecture next week.  Her lecture, entitled “There is No Sex in Soul,” will be 7 to 8:30 PM, in Monroe Hall Room 116.  This lecture will discuss Judith Sargent Murray, whose Gleaner Essays were among the first defenses of women’s intellectual equality in the new republic.

Dr. Carol Berkin, historian and Presidential Professor of American Colonial and Revolutionary History and Women’s History at Baruch College, specializes in women’s roles in American colonial history.  She is the author, editor, or co-editor of 14 books, including Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for American Independence (Knopf, 2005); A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution (Harcourt 2002), a 2002 History Book Club Selection awarded the Colonial Dames of America Book Prize in 2004; and Jonathan Sewall: Odyssey of an American Loyalist (Columbia University Press, 1974), nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.  In addition to teaching and writing, Berkin has been a consultant for many televised historical documentaries appearing on A&E, C-SPAN, History Channel, and PBS.  She is the recipient of numerous professional awards recognizing her work as an historian and an educator.  Berkin received holds an AB from Barnard College and MA from Columbia University.  She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University, receiving the Bancroft Award for Outstanding Dissertation.