Summer Internship (Paid) — Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

Application Deadline: March 15, 2020 or when 350 applications are received (please see details below)


This summer, be a part of a transformational experience that goes beyond just another internship. Through hands-on activities and original research, you will contribute to a national effort to share a diversity of women’s voices from the past and present. You will learn to use unique tools for civic engagement and representation in museum and other community spaces. You will develop familiarity and experience with museum practice and American women’s history.

Who? Undergraduate and recent graduates with a commitment to women’s history

What? Eight-week long cohort internship experience, with paid group housing, reimbursable travel to and from Washington D.C., and a weekly $382.50 stipend. The total value of this internship, including the weekly stipend and the paid group housing, is $6300 (not including travel reimbursement).

Where?  Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.

When? June 14 – August 8, 2020

Why? Opportunity to explore various career paths, networks, leadership and mentorship experiences, and build practical professional skills.

Application deadline: Be advised that this application will close on will close at 11:59 pm Eastern Time on either: (A) Sunday, March 15, 2020, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time or (B) The date that 350 applications are received; whichever occurs first. If the announcement closes on the date that 350 applications are received, all applications submitted by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time that day will be given consideration, including those in excess of 350.

See this link for full info and application instructions: https://womenshistory.si.edu/news/2020/02/paid-summer-internship-application-now-open

Talk: “Mexican Muralism Abroad” – Davida Fernandez-Barkan (2/20)


Mexican Muralism Abroad:

The Diplomacy of Arte Popular, 1920–1940

 

Davida Fernandez-Barkan

PhD Candidate Harvard University

Smithsonian Institution Predoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Thursday  February 20

Melchers 207

5pm

For more information contact Dr. Allyson Poska aposka@umw.edu

 

Image:Alfonso Xavier Peña, Rural Education, 1937. Oil on Canvas. Embassy of Mexico in France, Paris

Winter Celebration–And Best Wishes for Finals Week!

The Department enjoyed a Winter Celebration party with History and American Studies majors on Friday afternoon, after a great day of senior thesis presentations at our department’s research symposium.

Cheers to all who came to celebrate with snacks, games, and prizes, as well as good conversation. We’ll be celebrating again next spring, so stay tuned!

We’re on now to Finals Week. Stop by the the department hallway for coffee if you need a break between exams. We’ll have some brewing. Best of luck with finals, papers, and projects, and have a great winter break!

History and American Studies Symposium–December 6, 2019

 

History and American Studies Symposium

University of Mary Washington – Friday, December 6, 2019
9:00 am – 1:00 pm

 

SESSION ONE. 9 AM. Monroe 210 – Writing, Texts, and History
Moderator: Dr. Krystyn Moon

Carolyn Stough. “Gender and Perspective in Eighteenth-Century Women’s Travel Writing”

Justin Curtis. “Performing Imperialism: Dime Novel Representations of Wild West Folk Heroes”

Kyle Moore. “Shanghai as a Representation of China in 1930s Chinese Fiction”

 

SESSION TWO. 9 AM. Monroe 111 – Infernos and Fevers in United States History
Moderator: Dr. Jeffrey McClurken

Connor Carmichael. “The Great Conflagration of 1871: A Social History of the Great Fire’s Aftermath in Chicago”

Nicole Stell. “Presidential Illnesses of the Twentieth Century and the Role of the White House Physician”

 

SESSION THREE. 10 AM. Monroe 210 – Selected Papers in American Studies and U.S. History
Moderator: Dr. Erin Devlin

Cassiel Haynes. “Migrant Labor through the Eyes of Braceros”

Courtlyn Plunkett. “Americanization at Hull House”

Rebecca A. Akers. “Dolley Madison: The Real First Lady”

 

SESSION FOUR. 10 AM. Monroe 111 – Military History and World War II
Moderator: Dr. Susan Fernsebner

Jack Hagn. “Early United States Military Aviation: How American Aviation Stalled Out”

Devin Wright.  “Moral Courage: German Resistance against Hitler and the Nazis during World War II”

 

SESSION FIVE. 11 AM. Monroe 210 –  Religious History:  Of Mothers, Converts, and the Messiah
Moderator: Dr. Allyson Poska

Samantha Hampton. “Khadija: The Mother of the Believers”

Jacob Spencer. “Conversos and the Spanish Inquisition”

Alec Cameron. “Sabbatai Sevi: Kabbalah and the Messiah”

 

SESSION SIX. 11 AM. Monroe 111 – New Perspectives in American Studies
Moderator: Dr. Steven Harris

Ellora Larsen. “‘Only a Footnote in History’: Native Americans in Decline of the Western and the Rise of Red Power, 1950-1970”

Ginny Bixby. “The Complicated Legacy of a Segregationist: The Renaming of Mills E. Godwin Middle School”

Sherronda Robinson. African American Involvement in the ‘Just Say No’ Campaign.

 

SESSION SEVEN. 1 PM. MONROE 210 – Environment and U.S. History
Moderator: Dr. Porter Blakemore

Cole Hogan.  “History of the Rappahannock River”

William Roszell. “Urbanna Oyster Festival: A History of Celebration through the Festival”

Nick Skibinski. “Secessions in Succession: Contrasting South Carolina and Virginia in the Secession Crisis”

 

SESSION EIGHT. 1 PM. MONORE 111 – Famine, War, and Labor
Moderator: Dr. Nabil Al-Tikriti

Erica Piper. “Ukranian Resentment: The Famine of 1932-33 Recounted by Ukranian Peasants” [S. Harris]

Timothy Shinkle. “Soviet-Afghan War: Understanding the Complexity Surrounding the War through the Soviet Perspective”

Will Everett.  “A Long and Bitter Fight: The Interplay of Socialism, Organized Labor, and Nationalism during the Irish Revolution, 1912-1923”

 

Talk: “The Hamilton Phenomenon: Is it Good for History?” (10/21, 7:30 pm)

People of Caledon Program at Caledon State Park – “Life of the Enslaved” (Sat., 10/19)

Dr. Krystyn Moon Winner of Brennan Archaeology Award

On October 2, Krystyn Moon, Professor of History and American Studies Program Director, was awarded the 2019 Brennan Archaeology Award as a member of the Fort Ward Interpretive Committee (together with Frank Cooling, Mary Furlong Minkoff, Carol Johnson, Frances Terrell, Adrienne Washington, and Charles Ziegler.)

The Alexandria Archaeological Commission announced the award, which was presented by Mayor Wilson and Councilmember Redella “Del” Pepper. Dr. Moon has volunteered for the past few years doing history research as part of the Fort Ward Interpretive Committee to provide an integrated narrative of the Fort Ward City Park, which was the site of a Union fort and an African American neighborhood from the 1860s through the 1960s. Dr. Moon has shared her work as both a professional historian and a city resident.

The Fort Ward Interpretive Committee was celebrated at the event”for their stalwart devotion to the ongoing interpretation of history at Fort Ward Park; for their leadership in guiding and directing the implementation of a new interpretive experience for visitors to the park, as a Civil War fort and then the center of an African American community; for their pursuit of and vision for a new and updated park history based on the theme, Bastions of Freedom, which charts the arc of history at the park from Civil War to Civil Rights; and for immeasurably enhancing the interpretation of the park with their knowledge, foresight, and dedication to one of Alexandria’s most treasured historical sites.”

For more, see Professor Moon’s own report on the history of Fort Ward City Park, entitled “Finding the Fort: A History of an African American Neighborhood in Northern Virginia, 1860s-1960s.”