Exploring Fredericksburg’s Watershed

Students from the “Virginia Issues and Controversies” class paddled along the Rappahannock River last Friday after discussing the environmental issues facing Fredericksburg’s watershed.

In addition to observing various water pollutants, they had an opportunity to see some of the river’s local residents, including kingfishers, bald eagles, and even Goose George.

Students kayaking

History and American Studies – Club Meeting (Sept. 8)

Internship Opportunity – American Historical Association (deadline 8/27)

The American Historical Association is seeking undergraduate students to work remotely as interns during the fall semester. AHA interns work on a variety of projects and gain insight into historical and nonprofit work. Students will be matched with an AHA staff member who will mentor and oversee their work. They will have an opportunity to attend departmental and general staff meetings and to learn about the day-to-day work of the world’s largest professional association of historians.

Accepted interns will need to receive either a stipend or course credit from their home institutions; we understand this is not possible in many cases, but we cannot accept an intern who receives neither stipend nor course credit. Hours are negotiable, though we are estimating approximately a 10-20 hour/week commitment during the fall, depending on the student’s schedule.

In their cover letter, interested candidates should indicate which department and/or project they are most interested in working with and any relevant experiences.

  • Academic & Professional Affairs:
    • An intern will assist with the data collection and standardization necessary for the expansion of the Where Historians Work database. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel is required.
    • An intern will assist with the analysis and visualization of survey data collected by the AHA’s Survey of Doctoral Programs. Experience with data visualization tools would be helpful, but is not required.
  • Research & Publications:
    • An intern will assist on the “Racist Histories & the AHA” research project by performing database research and working with the AHA’s archive. Experience with data visualization tools is preferred but not required.

Applications are due by Friday, August 27, and will be considered on a rolling basis.

How to apply:

  • Log into your MY AHA account. If you don’t have an account, you can create one for free.
  • Click “Available Application Forms” in the AHA Awards, Grants, and Jobs section.
  • Click Apply next to the AHA Internship link. In the section labeled Supporting Documents, upload a single PDF with a cover letter, CV or resume, and the contact information for two references. Separate letters of recommendation are NOT required.

Please contact Alexandra Levy, AHA’s digital communications coordinator, with any questions.

Phi Alpha Theta – Congratulations to New Inductees

Phi Alpha Theta Group Zoom Photo

The Department of History and American Studies was delighted to welcome new inductees to the Phi Alpha Theta honor society this past week. Phi Alpha Theta is the academic honor society founded in 1921 to “promote the study of study of history through the encouragement of research, good teaching, publication, and the exchange of learning and ideas among historians.”

UMW’s own Upsilon Delta chapter is happy to announce the induction of the following new members:

2020:

Alexander T. Moses
Jaelynn K. Scott
Grace Anne Corkran
Kimberly A. Eastridge
Nicole A Haynes
Madelyn K. Shiflett
Jonathan Zwemer
Michael Silberstein
Emily Lauren Thompson
Sydney J. Morrison
Gianna Banish
Deborah Hunnel
Jacob R. James

2021:

Cody M. Youngblood
Katie Cecilia Molina
Jean-Pierre Maldonado
Morgan L. Gilbert
Madison F. Kidwell
Megan E. Williams
Lauryn M. Bailey
Emilia L. Michalkiewicz
Taylor E. Coleman
Chandler Carlson
Lyndsey Marie Clark
Christopher A. O’Neil
Karl Jessen

Congratulations again to our 2020 and 2021 Phi Alpha Theta members! More information on Phi Alpha Theta can be found here.

How to Register for HIST / AMST 485

Wondering how to register for a 485?

Students wishing to register for HIST 485 or AMST 485 cannot do so through regular online registration. Registration for these senior thesis independent studies requires a form signed by the instructor and the department chair.

All steps–meeting with the instructor to receive approval of a topic, signatures, and submission–can be handled remotely.

Once a student has an instructor’s okay for a topic, they should email that info to Prof. Ferrell (cferrell@umw.edu) who will fill out the form, handle signatures, and submit the form to the registrar.

 

Image: Abel & Company, photographer. New York City book campaign / Abel & Company, Inc., commercial photographers, 903 E Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. New York, 1919. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2016646295/.

History and American Studies Symposium – December 4, 2020

 

Department of History and American Studies
University of Mary Washington
Fall 2020 Symposium – Friday, December 4

The Department of History and American Studies will present its Fall 2020 Undergraduate Research Symposium on Zoom on Friday, December 4, 2020. For more information, please contact Dr. Susan Fernsebner (sfernseb@umw.edu).

 

9:00-9:50 AM

SESSION ONE. “The American Dream, Social Injustice, and Ideologies of Dissent: Selected Papers” –  Moderator: Dr. Erin Devlin

Mariah Morton. “I Love Lucy: Family and Gender Roles in the 1950s”

Gianna Banish. “Exploring the Transformation of Malcolm X Ideology”

Cody Bowler. “Watts and Rodney King: More Than Riots”

 

SESSION TWO. “Historical Studies on World War I and II” – Moderator: Dr. Porter Blakemore

Sarah Pietrowski.A Comparative Analysis of the Responses of the United Kingdom and the United States to the Jewish Refugee Crisis Prior to World War II”

Michael Mallery. ““The Experiences of Thomas Callaway in the Second World War”

Megan Mydlow. “Admiral Nimitz: His Strategic Mindset and Leadership Role in the Pacific Theater”

 

10:10-11:00 AM

SESSION THREE. “Dragon Myths, Medieval Literacy, and the Role of the Tournament: Selected Papers in European History” – Moderator: Dr. Bruce O’Brien

Kassie Phillips. “The Conceptual Evolution of the Dragon: The Convergence of Greek, Germanic , Celtic, and Christian Mythologies and the Modern Dragon”

Matthew Abbot.  “Early Medieval European Literacy: Francia and England”

Daniel Noel. “The Role and Effects of the Tournament in Medieval Western Europe”

 

SESSION FOUR.  “Of Bound Feet and Flying Witches: Topics in East Asian Studies” – Moderator: Dr. Susan Fernsebner

Katie Molina. “Western Influences in the Anti-Footbinding Movement, 1860-1912”

Alison Poisson. “Gender & Miyazaki’s World: Witches, Feminists, and Other Scary Things”

 

11:20 AM – 12:10 PM

SESSION FIVE. “Gender, Race, and the Environment: Themes in U.S. History” – Moderator: Dr. Jason Sellers

Christina M. Cowart. “Breaking Through the Barriers: Women in Early Jazz”

Thomas Bascom. “Race, Citizenship, The Frontier, and American Identity in 20th Century Scouting Movements”

Justin L. Binns. “Undamming America: A Regional Case Study”

 

SESSION SIX. “Selected Papers in United States History” – Moderator: Dr. Allyson Poska

Jordan Petty. “Glass Nast: How Nineteenth-Century Cartoonist Thomas Nast Is a Window into Postbellum America”

Paul Hogue. “Tulsa Race Riot: Accessing Economic Envy and Fear of Interracial Sex in Jim Crow Era Oklahoma”

Kimberly Eastridge. “The Patriarchy Discussed Through I Love Lucy, The Honeymooners, and Leave It to Beaver.”

 

SESSION SEVEN. “New Military Histories: Local and Global” – Moderator: Dr. Nabil Al-Tikriti

Lauren Frye. “Culpepper, VA: Caught in the Crossroads”

Maddie Shiflett.  “‘On the Verge of Liberty’: The Impact of Advocacy and Federal Policy at the Point Lookout Contraband Camp”

Dennis Gill. “NATO’s Long, Bloody Road to the Kosovo War”

 

12:30-1:20 PM

SESSION EIGHT. “The Inscribed Canvas of History: Sweethearts, Notorious Dictators, and Prison Tattoos” – Moderator: Dr. Steven Harris

Shannon Payne. “London’s Sweethearts or Most Notorious Criminals: The Kray Twins”

Tara Scroggins. “Converging Lives: A Comparative History of Hitler and Stalin”

Cathryn Kinde. “Sex, Stars, and Stalin: An Examination of Russian Prison Tattoos in the Soviet Era”

 

SESSION NINE. “Topics in 19th and 20th Century History” – Moderator: Dr. Claudine Ferrell

Amanda Huber. “Dr. Charles West and the New World of Pediatric Medicine”

Anne-Marie Guelcher. “‘Something Beautiful’ – The Horses, Heroes, and History of Operation Cowboy and Race to Save Austria’s White Gold”

Corey Harrison. “American ‘Devil Dogs’: Newspapers and Perceptions of the Marine Corps in World War I”

 

Library of Congress – Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program (2021)

The Library of Congress offers a paid Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program for 2021 (via telework). As their official description notes:

“The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world’s largest library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists, fellows increase access to and engagement with collection materials. United States citizens currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate school are invited to apply for consideration as a Junior Fellow.”

Open & Closing dates for application: 11/05/2020-11/30/2020

Paid internship / student stipend provided.

For full details and application information, see:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/583762600