Eric Halsey – History Careers Outside of Academia and the U.S. (10/16)

Dr. Krystyn Moon Winner of Brennan Archaeology Award

On October 2, Krystyn Moon, Professor of History and American Studies Program Director, was awarded the 2019 Brennan Archaeology Award as a member of the Fort Ward Interpretive Committee (together with Frank Cooling, Mary Furlong Minkoff, Carol Johnson, Frances Terrell, Adrienne Washington, and Charles Ziegler.)

The Alexandria Archaeological Commission announced the award, which was presented by Mayor Wilson and Councilmember Redella “Del” Pepper. Dr. Moon has volunteered for the past few years doing history research as part of the Fort Ward Interpretive Committee to provide an integrated narrative of the Fort Ward City Park, which was the site of a Union fort and an African American neighborhood from the 1860s through the 1960s. Dr. Moon has shared her work as both a professional historian and a city resident.

The Fort Ward Interpretive Committee was celebrated at the event”for their stalwart devotion to the ongoing interpretation of history at Fort Ward Park; for their leadership in guiding and directing the implementation of a new interpretive experience for visitors to the park, as a Civil War fort and then the center of an African American community; for their pursuit of and vision for a new and updated park history based on the theme, Bastions of Freedom, which charts the arc of history at the park from Civil War to Civil Rights; and for immeasurably enhancing the interpretation of the park with their knowledge, foresight, and dedication to one of Alexandria’s most treasured historical sites.”

For more, see Professor Moon’s own report on the history of Fort Ward City Park, entitled “Finding the Fort: A History of an African American Neighborhood in Northern Virginia, 1860s-1960s.”

Talking History with Dr. Nabil Al-Tikriti: “A Year in Baku” (9/25)

Welcome to the Fall ’19 Semester

Welcome to all! We’re happy to kick off the Fall semester on Monday, August 26th.

If you’re an American Studies or History major working on a thesis this fall, we’ll be hosting a meeting at 5:00 on Monday (8/26) in Monroe 210. Dr. Claudine Ferrell will share information and tips for preparation and success. Planning on a thesis for the spring and want to learn more? Feel free to join the meeting.

Stay tuned for more info on our fall Talking History speaker series!

 

Fall 2018 History and American Studies Symposium


Fall 2018 – History and American Studies Symposium

University of Mary Washington: Department of History and American Studies

Friday, December 7, 2018

 

 

SESSION ONE. 9 AM. Monroe 210 – From World War II to Wonder Woman: Military and Cultural Histories
Moderator: Dr. Claudine Ferrell

Francisco Palomo – “Aircraft Carrier Development of the Royal, United States, and Imperial Japanese Navies”

Madeleine McCullough – “The Codebreakers of World War II: The Talented Minds that Led to an Allied Victory in 1945”

Khayla McGowan – “Wonder Woman: How She Went from a Superheroine to a Superhero”

 

SESSION TWO. 9 AM. Monroe 111 – Japan and China in the 20th Century: Gender, Media, and Animation
Moderator: Dr. Krystyn Moon

Alyssa Ruhlen – “The Power of Perspective: Investigating the Empress Dowager Cixi and the Role of Print Media from 1898-1914”

Elise Trommer – “‘Does the Steel Princess Need an Escort?’ Representations of Gender in Japanese Animation, 1988-1995”

Kaylee Tye – “Women in the 1960s Depicted Through Chinese Cinema”

 

SESSION THREE. 10 AM. Monroe 210 – American Nativism: New Ideas of the Body Politic at the Turn of the Century
Moderator: Dr. Bruce O’Brien

McKenzie Dowdy – “The 1891 New Orleans Lynchings of Italian Immigrants: Racism, Nativism, and the Notion of Whiteness”

Kelsey Phillips – “Typhoid Mary: An Analysis of the Stereotypes of Female Irish Immigrants”

Sarah Jones – “Denis Kearney and His Impact on the Anti-Chinese Movement in Late-Nineteenth Century California”

 

SESSION FOUR. 10 AM. Monroe 111 – Selected Papers in U.S. and Global History
Moderator: Dr. Susan Fernsebner

Margaret Lewandowski – “Different Experiences of the Same Atrocity: A Multinational Comparison of Comfort Women Experiences”

Alex Friedrich – “A Failure in Justice: William Calley and the My Lai Massacre”

Maya Watson – “Racialized Notions of Beauty in the 20th Century”

 

SESSION FIVE. SESSION. 11 AM. Monroe 210 – The Middle Ages: Medicine, Gender, and Feuds
Moderator: Dr. Porter Blakemore

Jessie Whitmer – “Shifts in Medieval Medicine: The Progression of Medical Practices Throughout the Middle Ages”

Jason Elms – “Fixing the Feud: The Relation between Royal Authority and Feud in Medieval England, Iceland, and Norway”

Paige Hildebrand – “The Empress Matilda: Sex, Gender, and Leadership in Twelfth Century England”

 

SESSION SIX. 11 AM. Monroe 111 – Selected Papers on Colonialism and Diplomatic History
Moderator: Dr. Will Mackintosh

Lakelyn Wiley – “Intercolonial Conflict in West Africa: Sierra Leone and Liberia”

Nicole McCormick – “Queen Lili’uokalani’s Resistance to U.S. Colonization and Influence on the Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement”

Zhen Chen – “Only Nixon and Mao: Framing U.S.-Chinese  Rapprochement Through the Individuals”

 

SESSSION SEVEN. 1 PM. Monroe 210 – Topics in U.S. History: Late 19th and 20th Century
Moderator: Dr. Erin Devlin

Nathan Harpine – “Voice in a Segregated Church: African American Clergy and Ministry in the Episcopal Dioceses of Virginia and Southern Virginia, 1870-1915”

Kaitryn Evans – “The 1920 New York State Assembly: A Case Study of the Undemocratic Expulsion of Five Socialist Members”

Allison Griffith – “African American Educational Opportunities in Prince Edward County: 1959-1964”

 

SESSION EIGHT. 1 PM. Monroe 111 – Medicine, Motion Pictures and Urban Spaces: Topics in U.S. History
Moderator: Dr. Jason Sellers

Andrew Snead – “Confederate Medicine: The Struggle to Save Lives”

Benjamin Masse – “Independent Cities: Why They Were Created and Kept, to Help Citizens”

Internship Opportunity: Federal Reserve Board

The Federal Reserve Board has an opening for a summer intern in the Records Management Program. The internship is open to undergraduate and graduate students. See below for the official description. The link to the Federal Job Search site at which the official announcement can be found is at the bottom of this description:

Records Management Intern Summer 2019 (OSEC)-21162
Primary Location: DC-Washington
Employee Status: Temporary
Overtime Status: Non-exempt
Job Type: Internship
Travel: No
Shift: Day Job
Years of Experience Required: 0
Education Required: Some College
Relocation Provided: No
Salary Grade Low: 20
Posting Date: Oct 22, 2018

Position Description:
The Records Management Program (RMP) promotes sound records management in support of the Board’s and OSEC’s strategic direction, and in compliance with federal records management laws and regulations. The program creates policies and provides services that result in the proper creation, management, and availability of Board documentation.

Position Requirements
The Records section in the Office of the Secretary of the Federal Reserve Board is seeking a summer intern assist Board staff on records management consulting services and other records management projects:
1. Draft training materials for Rapid Response sessions and the Board’s annual records training program;
2. Participate in records evaluation projects;
3. Draft records control schedules for submission to the National Archives and Records Administration;
4. Review Board SharePoint sites and Reserve Bank FedShare sites that are decommissioning to determine if records contained in the sites are eligible for destruction or should be preserved; and,
5. Manage the Federal Reserve Integrated Records Management Architecture (FIRMA) collections. FIRMA maintains electronic versions of Board records in compliance with legal recordkeeping requirements for federal agencies. Intern will add documents and determine the required metadata to facilitate access and conduct searches for documents to respond to FOIA and general requests.

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and do not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, genetic information, or application, membership, or service in the uniformed services.

https://www.federalreserve.gov/start-job-search.htm

Talking History (9/25): Dina Bailey and Braden Paynter