Internship Opportunity: Federal Reserve Board

The Federal Reserve Board has an opening for a summer intern in the Records Management Program. The internship is open to undergraduate and graduate students. See below for the official description. The link to the Federal Job Search site at which the official announcement can be found is at the bottom of this description:

Records Management Intern Summer 2019 (OSEC)-21162
Primary Location: DC-Washington
Employee Status: Temporary
Overtime Status: Non-exempt
Job Type: Internship
Travel: No
Shift: Day Job
Years of Experience Required: 0
Education Required: Some College
Relocation Provided: No
Salary Grade Low: 20
Posting Date: Oct 22, 2018

Position Description:
The Records Management Program (RMP) promotes sound records management in support of the Board’s and OSEC’s strategic direction, and in compliance with federal records management laws and regulations. The program creates policies and provides services that result in the proper creation, management, and availability of Board documentation.

Position Requirements
The Records section in the Office of the Secretary of the Federal Reserve Board is seeking a summer intern assist Board staff on records management consulting services and other records management projects:
1. Draft training materials for Rapid Response sessions and the Board’s annual records training program;
2. Participate in records evaluation projects;
3. Draft records control schedules for submission to the National Archives and Records Administration;
4. Review Board SharePoint sites and Reserve Bank FedShare sites that are decommissioning to determine if records contained in the sites are eligible for destruction or should be preserved; and,
5. Manage the Federal Reserve Integrated Records Management Architecture (FIRMA) collections. FIRMA maintains electronic versions of Board records in compliance with legal recordkeeping requirements for federal agencies. Intern will add documents and determine the required metadata to facilitate access and conduct searches for documents to respond to FOIA and general requests.

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and do not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, genetic information, or application, membership, or service in the uniformed services.

https://www.federalreserve.gov/start-job-search.htm

Internship Diary: Claire Goode (2017)

This semester (Fall 2017), I interned with the The Papers of James Monroe, creating an online exhibit for James Monroe’s 1818 tour of the Chesapeake. Having taken the class “The World of James Monroe” offered by the UMW History Department a couple years ago, I had a fairly thorough grounding in the history surrounding Monroe’s presidency. During Monroe’s first term in office, beginning in 1817, he undertook a series of tours to scope out new sites for military fortifications and strengthen America’s system of defense in the wake of the War of 1812. These tours, originally designed for the sole purpose of assessing military potential, took on another role as citizens desired to meet the president, exhibit their patriotism, and celebrate the potential of their cities. With this in mind, I began researching the shortest of his tours, which lasted a little under three weeks, and encompassed the Chesapeake Bay area.

Claire at the Roman Forum

Claire at the Roman Forum

For this research, I used transcriptions of primary sources collected in the James Monroe Papers. From these documents, including letters, memoirs, diary entries, and newspaper articles, I had to recreate a spotty timeline of events. Having determined Monroe’s exact agenda as nearly as possible, I began searching for pictures that were relevant to the information I had gathered. I found this one of the more difficult processes. I spent almost a month tracking down images that could be in anyway related to the topics, people, or places I was discussing. While I often found this process very frustrating, I profited massively from the help and instruction of my supervisors. Some of the things I learned included the acceptability of substituting the image you want to find for the image you can get, especially when the former isn’t forthcoming, and the necessity of using digitized local archives. I was able to use my general knowledge of a subject or place, as well as my researching capabilities, to my advantage. While this process was the most foreign to me, it was also the most exciting, especially when I finally found the exact image I wanted.

When I had completed my search for images, I began crafting my tour. This was another aspect I found difficult. As a history major, I am used to using sources and facts to support and explain my projects or papers. But in creating an exhibit, I had to be very aware of what images I could use to craft an acceptable narrative. It was very difficult for me to adjust to this style where every statement doesn’t have to be justified and every subject researched doesn’t have to be included. When I finished crafting the text, pairing relevant images with significant points, I used TimelineJS to display the exhibit. While the system is difficult to adapt to specific needs, it fit my project well and I found it easy to figure out after an initial explanation. Overall, this process has been incredibly informative, allowing me to expand my knowledge of both digital history and museum studies. I’ve enjoyed learning a new set of skills, and adapting my capabilities to a new way of presenting history.

Internships: The Valentine (Richmond, VA)

The Valentine museum is currently accepting applications for Spring 2018 internships. They are accepting applications from students interested in working in one of the following departments:

Archives
Costumes & Textiles
Education & Public Programs
General Collections
Fundraising and Development
PR & Marketing

Intern descriptions can be viewed here and students are encouraged to use their online application: https://thevalentine.org/programs-tours/college/college-internship-application/

Internship Diary: Kelsey Brey (’17)

During the spring 2017 semester, I interned at the Fredericksburg Commonwealth Attorney’s Office. Over the course of the semester, I worked hands-on with several attorneys helping them to prepare for high-profile cases in the City of Fredericksburg. I used analytical and research skills that I learned over my history career at UMW to write jury instructions, research jurors, draft plea agreements, and more. I was given the opportunity to sit in on attorney meetings, disbreycuss ideas for how to move forward with certain cases, and communicate with witnesses and victims. The skills and experiences I gained from this internship and UMW have guided me into pursuing a career in law.

In fall 2017, I will be attending Elon Law School in Greensboro, North Carolina. Working closely with the attorneys has solidified my desire to pursue criminal prosecution. Criminal prosecution isn’t strictly about “putting the bad guys away”; it is about giving justice to the people that don’t have a voice – the victims who rely on the police officers, sheriffs, and the Commonwealth Attorney to do what is right by the community it defends. On the other side, defense attorneys don’t just “defend the bad guys”; they are integral in providing a face to the crime. Over the course of my internship, I learned two important lessons. The first is that the defendants are people and have a story. They aren’t just case numbers and it is important to remember that. Second, I was speaking with one of the attorneys and he told me what his law school professor told him. “At the end of the day, no one is a winner. The victims carry the crime with them the rest of their lives and have to suffer through the emotional, mental, and sometimes physical harm forever. The defendants don’t win either. They may have to endure prison sentences and their families are effected by the crimes they committed.” There is no winner in the law and I am grateful to have had this experience to see this firsthand.

Bobby Chandler Internship Program (deadline: March 1)

Bobby Chandler Internship Program (http://thevalentine.org/programs-tours/internships)

The Valentine’s Bobby Chandler Internship program is generously funded by the Kip Kephard Foundation and the Henry Valentine Fund.  A minimum commitment of 150 hours is required and an honorarium of $1000 will be provided upon completion. Funded internships are open to students currently enrolled in college or graduate school as well as recent graduates (graduated within the last 6 months) seeking professional experience.  The deadline for completed applications is Tuesday, March 1st, 2016. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

The Program is currently seeking interns interested in working with the following departments.
Archives & Exhibitions
General Collections
Costumes & Textiles
Finance and HR (Accounting)
Public Relations and Development
Visitor Services and Museum Store Merchandising
To apply for a Bobby Chandler internship please follow the instructions below:
  1. Review intern job descriptions.
  2. Fill out the online application.
  3. Include your cover letter, resume, references and unofficial academic transcripts (hint PDFs work best!). If transcript cannot be uploaded to the application, please submit via email (by the March 1st deadline) as a pdf document to intern@thevalentine.org.
  4. Any supplemental materials that are not required (additional transcripts, letters of recommendation), should be mailed to the Valentine at the address below:
The Valentine
Attn: Marisa Day

1015 E. Clay Street

Richmond, VA 23219
Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Selection Timeline
A review of applications will begin  on March 2nd.  Applicants selected for interviews will be contacted on or around the week of March 21st with final decisions being made the 1st or 2nd week in  April. If you have any questions, please contact Marisa Day, Student Programs and Tours Manager at 804.694.0711 ext 317 or via email intern@thevalentine.org.
 
 

 

Mt. Vernon Historic Trades Summer Internships (deadline 2/26)


Summer Internship Application Deadline – February 26, 2016
Each year, Mount Vernon’s Historic Trades accepts a select number of applicants for summer internships. With focus on the Pioneer Farm and George Washington’s Distillery & Gristmill, these internships provide an excellent opportunity for undergraduate students to become immersed in 18th-century history, agriculture, and industry.

After completing a brief training program, interns will work as full-time Historic Trades Interpreters for a period of 10 weeks under the direction of our professional interpretive staff. Interns live on the grounds of George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate during the internship. In addition, interns participate in special field trips to other historic sites and museums in the region.

For more information see this link.

Internship: Collection Management (Deadline 1/23)


Collection Management Internship at the John J. Johnson Archives Center

Fredericksburg United Methodist Church

Spring 2015

The John J. Johnson Archives Center of the Fredericksburg United Methodist Church consists of official documents, papers, photographs, recordings, books and artifacts. The church, founded in 1802, is located at 308 Hanover Street in Fredericksburg’s Historic District. The mission of the Center is to catalog and index this collection. The Center will make these items accessible to church members, scholars, educational institutions and the general public for study and research. The Center’s dedicated, climate controlled work area comprises a work room with a scanner, printers and computer equipment, as well as a storage closet with approximately 30 cardboard boxes of papers, photographs, artifacts, etc.

Intern Duties:

The intern will index the collection’s documents and objects using PastPerfect 5.0 software. PastPerfect is a leader in collection and contact management software. Several local museums use PastPerfect, including the Central Rapphannock Heritage Center, the Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center, and the James Monroe Museum (operated by the University of Mary Washington). Training CDs will be available for learning how to use the software. Opportunities exist for collaboration with other local museums familiar with PastPefect.

Learning Outcomes for the Intern:

  1. Understand the importance of preserving documents and objects and making them accessible to the public.
  1. Become familiar with PastPerfect software and learn how to attach images, keep data safe, focus on efficiency, and maintain consistent collections data entry.
  2. Understand the role of technology and reformatting collections in modern archival management.

The intern should have keyboarding and computer skills, with a demonstrated ability to perform detailed work.

A member of the church’s Heritage Committee will be available to supervise the intern during the fall semester. Internships for 1 credit require 42 hours’ work; 2 credits require 84 hours; 3 credits require 126 hours. Academic credit is available through the History and Historic Preservation departments. Academic credit is not available through the Museum Studies program.

To apply for the internship, send a cover letter and resume to Margaret Mock, Co-Director, John J. Johnson Archives Center, mmock@umw.edu. Deadline for the 2015 spring semester is January 23.