Rafferty Publishes Two Essays from Forthcoming Book in The Rumpus

The Rumpus has published two essays written by Colin Rafferty, Associate Professor of English. The essays are excerpts from Rafferty's forthcoming book Execute the Office: Essays with Presidents. The first, “Preamble,” is the first essay of the book, while the second, “Dissolve To,” considers the Reagan presidency through the lenses of film scripts and John Wayne movies. … [Read more...]

Lee Leads Linguistics Teach-In

Janie Lee, Associate Professor of Linguistics, recently led a teach-in in the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. The teach-in was part of the workshop "Room at the Table: Locating Asian Identity in Linguistics and the LSA." In it, Lee gave a short presentation on teaching Asian American linguistics and facilitated an informal discussion. The conference was held virtually from January 7 through January 10, 2021. … [Read more...]

Barrenchea Presents on Novelist Leslie Marmon Silko at MLA

Antonio Barrenechea, Professor of English, recently contributed to "Poetics of Persistence in Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead: Perspectives on the Thirtieth Anniversary," a special session of the virtual Modern Language Association conference in January 2021. The MLA is the flagship organization for literary studies in the United States. … [Read more...]

Rafferty Publishes Essay, Participates in Discussion

Colin Rafferty has published an essay on Dwight D. Eisenhower, “Kansas, She Said, Is the Name of the Star (#34),” in the newest issue of Bennington Review. He also participated in a discussion regarding nonfiction writing, historical commemoration, and monuments through Fountain Bookstore in Richmond with Connor Towne O'Neill, author of Down Along with That Devil’s Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy. The video of the talk is available here. … [Read more...]

Krista Beucler ’20 Wins Flash Fiction Award

Krista Beucler ’20 recently won the 2020 Julia Peterkin Award for flash fiction from South 85 Journal, run by Converse College’s MFA program. Her story will appear in their fall/winter 2020 issue. Details are available on their blog and Facebook page. Krista completed her degree this spring with a major in English: Creative Writing and minors in Spanish and Museum Studies. While at UMW, Krista was the recipient of the Laurie Mansell Reich ’79 and Henry E. Reich Jr. Scholarship and was a finalist for the Barbara Thomas Phillips Creative Writing Scholarship. … [Read more...]

Celebrating the National Day on Writing on Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Tuesday, October 20, 2020 is the National Day on Writing, an annual celebration established by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). The University of Mary Washington is observing this day in socially distanced fashion through digital writing and writing about the pandemic, which necessitates our socially distanced activities. UMW's Department of English and Linguistics, Simpson Library, the UMW Writing Center, Honors, and others invite you to share online why you write (using the hashtag #WhyIWrite) and by composing 6-10 word stories about life during the pandemic. For more information, follow Simpson’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and respond to their prompts. You can also add your thoughts and comments to Simpson’s Call to Contribute page and document your experiences during COVID-19; for more information, see their web page. Professor Brenta Blevins, of the Department of English and Linguistics, has developed a short video on the physical and emotional … [Read more...]

Riris ’19 Is Pursuing MA in French Studies in Provence

Eleni Riris ’19 (double major in Linguistics and French) is currently pursuing an M.A. in French Studies, specializing in Teaching French as a Foreign Language, at the American College of the Mediterranean in Aix-en-Provence, France. For more information, see Eleni's website. A piece of her calligraphy from her site is included below. … [Read more...]

Alum, Professor Emeritus Publish Book Reviews

Sunday's Free Lance-Star featured book reviews by Ashley Riggleson, UMW '18 with a major in English, and Dan Dervin, Professor Emeritus of English. Riggleson's review of Finna by Nate Marshall is available online. Dervin's review of Things in Jars by Jess Kidd is also available online. … [Read more...]

Joey LoMonaco ’13 Wins Outstanding Young Journalist of the Year

Joey LoMonaco '13 has been named 2019 Outstanding Young Journalist of the Year by the Virginia Press Association for his work at the Free Lance-Star. Joey was an English: Creative Writing major at UMW and graduated cum laude in 2013. The press release for LoMonaco's award reads:      In nominating LoMonaco for Outstanding Young Journalist of the Year, his editor said “Joey has a knack for finding and telling stories that appeal to all readers, regardless of their interest in the sport itself … Joey’s storytelling skill shines.”     LoMonaco has been a sports reporter at The Free Lance-Star since 2016, and has worked at several other news outlets since graduating from the University of Mary Washington with a bachelor’s degree in English in 2013.      Articles in LoMonaco’s portfolio covered brothers who were born in a refugee camp and who became soccer standouts at their high school, a swimmer who refused to let being born with essentially one leg stop him from … [Read more...]

Rafferty Book on Presidents Scheduled for Publication

Colin Rafferty, Associate Professor of English, has his second book, Execute the Office: Essays with Presidents, scheduled for publication on February 9, 2021, by Baobab Press. Rafferty's book is described on the Baobab Press website: Colin Rafferty’s Execute the Office uses lyric prose and formal invention to explore the humanity, or lack thereof, that thrived in each of the forty-five American presidents. Whether these powerful individuals were celebrated for infamous deeds and heroism, or forgotten as placeholders in the annals of American history, too often presidents are commemorated by the sterility of simple fact. Execute the Office builds upon factual accuracy with essays that are equally invested in lyrical writing and experimental forms. To balance these factions, Execute the Office uses constraint, metaphor, allusion, and epiphany to explore not just the facts and artifacts of history, but describe the connections between those facts and human nature in thought-provoking … [Read more...]