Will Mackintosh

wmackint@umw.edu faculty photograph

Will B. Mackintosh
Associate Professor
Office: Monroe 216
Phone: 540.654.1474
Email:  wmackint@umw.edu
Web: www.willmackintosh.org

Will B. Mackintosh holds graduate degrees from the University of Michigan and an undergraduate degree from Swarthmore College.  He is a cultural and social historian of the 19th century United States, with particular interests in the history of leisure and the history of the middle class.  He is currently working on a cultural and intellectual history of the origins of tourism in the United States, and also on a project dealing with horse thieves and other early forms of organized crime.  He offers courses on early American history, the American Revolution and Early Republic, gender history, and the history of the book.

Education

  • Ph.D., History, 2009. University of Michigan.
  • M.A., History, 2004. University of Michigan.
  • B.A., History, 2000. Swarthmore College.

Courses

History 131: United States History to 1865
History 202 HN: First-Year Seminar in American History: Good, Bad, and Ugly American Tourists (Honors)
History 298: History Practicum
History 318: American Revolution
History 319: Early American Republic
History 310: United States Urban History
History 326: History of Manhood in America
History 440: History of the Book
History 471E9: Cultural History of Capitalism in the US

 
Publications

Selling the Sights: The Invention of the Tourist in American Culture, 1790-1860.  New York: New York University Press, forthcoming 2018.

“The Prehistory of the American Tourist Guidebook.” Book History, forthcoming 2018.

“The Loomis Gang’s Market Revolution.” In Capitalism by Gaslight: Illuminating the Economy of Nineteenth-Century America, edited by Wendy A. Woloson and Brian P. Luskey.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015.

“Mechanical Aesthetics: Picturesque Tourism and the Transportation Revolution in Pennsylvania,” Pennsylvania History 81 (Winter 2014): 87-105.

“‘Ticketed Through:’ The Commodification of Travel in the Nineteenth Century,” The Journal of the Early Republic, V. 32, N. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 61-89.

“Leisure,” entry for Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012)

For further information, see willmackintosh.org