Mysterium Humanum returns for Spring 2019

  In the coming spring semester, CPR will offer its Mysterium Humanum Studies course for the thirteenth time since the department was created in 1979.  This is a public lecture series exploring a theme of enduring importance to the human condition from a variety of academic points of view.  The course was conceived when the department was formed, as a way to capitalize on its interdisciplinary character.  In previous years we have focused on Justice, Death, Time, God, Imagination, Power, Sex, and Wilderness, among others.  Students earn three credits in the course, but it is also free and open to the public. … [Read more...]

New Courses for Spring 2019

Open to all UMW students, CPR has two new courses for the spring semester! CPRD 299, Mysterium Humanum Studies: Madness, will use a multi-disciplinary set of guest lectures to explore the topic of madness. Approaches will include classics, philosophy, disability studies, religious studies, and art history, to name a few. The class meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 4:45 and satisfies major requirements for Classics, Philosophy, and Religious Studies majors. There are no prerequisites. RELG 231C4, Special Topics: Christianity in Africa, will survey the history of Christianity in Africa, particularly on selected regions: Egypt and sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Violet Gandiya (Ph.D. , University of Cambridge) will teach the course on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. There are no prerequisites, and the course satisfies an elective for Religious Studies majors. … [Read more...]

CPR mourns the passing of Dr. Diane Hatch

  It is with deep regret and sadness that the Dept. of Classics, Philosophy, and Religion announces the passing of its beloved colleague, Dr. Diane Hatch, Professor Emerita of Classics.  Prof. Hatch passed away on Saturday morning, October 13, 2018, at the age of 76. Prof. Hatch began teaching Latin and Classics at Mary Washington College in 1966 and retired in 2000. She received her B.A. in Latin from Sweet Briar College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill). Dr. Hatch co-edited with Dr. Elizabeth Clark The Golden Bough, The Oaken Cross: The Virgilian Cento of Faltonia Betitia Proba. Above all, she was dedicated to teaching and her students. … [Read more...]

UMW CPR Zen Garden Opening

  On Saturday, June 2nd at 3 p.m., CPR will celebrate the opening of the new Zen garden, located between Trinkle and Mason Halls. The garden is a joint venture funded by Classics, Philosophy, and Religion; the College of Arts and Sciences dean; and private donors. A reception will follow, and we hope you'll join us. … [Read more...]

Philosophy majors successfully defend honors theses

Last week, Kate Barry, Megan Murphy, Ben Willis, and Jonathan Hollingsworth successfully defended their senior theses in Philosophy. Congratulations to them and to all of the CPR majors graduating on Saturday, May 12, 2018! … [Read more...]

Schedule changes!

The snow has forced some changes to the Religious Freedom conference. Please see the updated schedule below. MARCH 22 UNIVERSITY CENTER, COLONNADE 10:00AM-10:30AM OPENING REMARKS 10:30AM-12:30PM SPEAKER PANEL 12:30PM-2:00PM LUNCH 2:00PM-4:30PM SPEAKER PANEL 4:30PM-4:45PM CLOSING REMARKS SPECIAL EVENT: MONROE HALL 116 7:00PM-8:30PM ROUNDTABLE MARCH 23 UNIVERSITY CENTER, COLONNADE 9:30AM-12:00PM SPEAKER PANEL 12:00PM-1:30PM LUNCH 1:30PM-2:30PM ESSAY WINNERS 2:30PM-4:00PM REFLECTION 4:00PM-4:15PM CLOSING REMARKS Speaker Panels Breakdown with titles March 22nd Panel 1: ANTI-INTELLECTUALISM AND RELIGIOUS FREEDOM Monica Miller (Lehigh University): “The Struggle of (Black) Gods Today: A.L.L.A.H and the Rhetoric of Divine Subjectivity”​ Benjamin Marcus (Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute): “Who Is the Expert?: Authority and Knowledge in Religious Literacy Education” Panel 2: Persecution complex MARY BETH MATHEWS (UNIVERSITY OF MARY … [Read more...]

Conference schedule for Religious Freedom in a Fractured America, March 22 and 23

  Please join us for UMW CPR's conference, Religious Freedom in a Fractured America. Day sessions will meet in the University Center's Colonnade Room on March 22 and 23. Thursday evening's special panel on "Religious Freedom in the Streets: Remembering Charlottesville" is set for Monroe 116 at 7 p.m. Many thanks to the University of Virginia's Center for the Study of Religion, UMW's Women's and Gender Studies Program, UMW's Political Science and International Affairs Department, the UMW Department of History and American Studies, and the UMW Leidecker Center for Asian Studies for their generous support! MARCH 22 UNIVERSITY CENTER, COLONNADE 9:30AM-10:00AM     Opening Remarks 10:00AM-12:30PM   Panel: Anti-Intellectualism and Religious Freedom Matthew Scherer (George Mason University): "religious freedom: a longer view on contemporary questions" Monica Miller (Lehigh University): “The Struggle of (Black) Gods Today: A.L.L.A.H and the Rhetoric of Divine … [Read more...]

Humanities grads do indeed succeed!

  As we’ve been telling our students for all these years, get a good education majoring in a field you have some passion for, and that will prepare you for a successful life. Here's the latest from Inside Higher Education.     … [Read more...]

UMW/CPR to host Conference “Wild Places, Natural Spaces”

14th Annual Conference The International Association for the Study of Environment, Space, and Place University of Mary Washington April 27-29, 2018 Conference Theme: Wild Places, Natural Spaces Call for papers We live in a world increasingly populated and altered by human beings. Along with the physical transformations have come fundamental changes in how we conceptualize our relationship with the world around us. Where once wild places represented darkness, danger, and temptation, they now conjure images of personal challenge (“conquering” the Appalachian trail or Mount Rainier), individual spiritual renewal, or hope against the degradation of rampant consumerism, inequality, or political rot. Nature—and its supposed pure form, wilderness—is both seen as the opposite of all things human and yet our true home. These changing and often inconsistent metaphors and models guide us in every area of our lives—the social, economic, aesthetic, philosophic, religious, and … [Read more...]

Fourth Annual Virginia Undergraduate Symposium

The Classics program will be hosting the Fourth Annual Virginia Undergraduate Research Symposium in Classics on Friday November 10th, 1-5 p.m., in the Hurley Convergence Center's Digital Auditorium. Free and open to the public. The program is below, and if you'd like more information, you can follow this link. Virginia Undergraduate Symposium in Classics IV University of Mary Washington, Hurley Convergence Center Digital Auditorium Friday, November 10, 2017      1-5 PM   Symposium Program   1-1:45 - Keynote: Dr. John Camp, Randolph-Macon College Recent Excavations at the Athenian Agora 1:45-2:00 - Questions and Answers 2:00-2:20 - Marshall LeMert (University of Mary Washington) The Tomb of Alexander the Great 2:20-2:40 - Rebekah Hale (Randolph-Macon College) Ancient Greek and Modern East African Tortoise Shell Lyres: An Ethnological Comparison 2:40-3:00 - Tess Monks (University of Richmond) Redundant Dido: Repetition and Alliteration in Virgil and … [Read more...]