Career Talk: Eric Halsey (UMW, ’11) – Monday, 9/25, 4 pm

Eric Halsey photoEric Halsey, recent UMW alumnus, History major, Fulbright grantee, and Study Abroad student, will discuss his independent career as a startup strategist based in Sofia, Bulgaria, and how he parlayed his collegiate study abroad experience into an international career.

​The talk will take place on Monday, Sept. 25, at 4 pm, in Monroe 210. 

This talk is jointly sponsored by the HISA Department, International Relations Organization, and Center for International Education.

 

“History in the News: Removing Confederate Monuments” (Talking History Series, 9/20)

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Student Opportunity: Museum Docent Position at The Weems-Botts Museum

193px-weems-botts_house_dumfries_virginia_001 Looking for an opportunity to gain museum experience? The Weems-Botts Museum seeks a docent to guide visitors through the historic house museum and to help with special programming (children’s activities, school field trips, etc.). They are open Wednesday-Sunday, May-October for public tours and offer tours by appointment and special programming year round. They also are have opportunities to gain experience writing for their newsletter, assisting with research for interpretation and exhibitions, planing new programs, and more.

 

The museum is named after Parson Weems, author of George Washington’s famous biography and originator of the cherry tree story, and Benjamin Botts, one of Aaron Burr’s defense attorney, who owned the home in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. However, Historic Dumfries Virginia’s mission is to preserve and promote the history of the area so much of the focus is on general town history, particularly colonial and Revolutionary War history. Dumfries was the oldest chartered town in Virginia and one of the four major shipping towns in colonial America, rivaling New York, Philadelphia, and Boston until its harbor silted in in the early 19th century. The Weems-Botts Museum is one of the three colonial buildings still standing in Dumfries.

 

If you are interested in the opportunity, contact Karleen Kovalcik at (703) 221-2218 or weemsbotts@msn.com. A form for online application is available here.

Ms. Kovalcik will be happy to discuss the possibility of internships for students and will consider student’s resumes for a weekend, part-time museum assistant position. The position will provide house tours when needed, but will also assist with museum administration and collections management. Ms. Kovalcik recently completed an MA in Public History and a Graduate Certificate in Cultural Resource Management from West Virginia University and has worked for multiple history organizations including Dumbarton House, Nantucket Historical Association, and Sully Historic Site. She will be happy to mentor an undergraduate who is interested in pursuing a career in public history.

 

Talking History Series 2017-2018

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Fulbright Information Evening – Wednesday 8/30

Would you like to study ballet in Moscow, opera in Italy, or Flemish Renaissance painters in Belgium? Would you like to research migration patterns into Western Europe, Nile River Valley irrigation methods, mathematics in Ukraine, chess in India, or the effects of global warming on tropical rain forests in Brazil? Would you like to teach English in Korea, Bulgaria, India, Germany, Japan, Italy, or several other countries? These and several other possibilities exist under the Fulbright/IIE program.

If so: Interested students and advisors are invited to a Fulbright information meeting this Wednesday, 30 August, 6:00 pm, Monroe 210.

If you are unsure what to do after graduation, and would like to spend a year teaching and/or conducting research abroad, consider submitting an application to the Fulbright Graduate and Research Abroad Program. This year’s national application deadline will be 6 October. The campus submission deadline will be 29 September.

Our campus Faculty Fulbright Committee is: Dianne Baker, Patricia Reynolds, Ann Witkowski, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich, Melina Patterson, and Rosemary Jesionowski. Please feel free to contact any of these faculty/staff colleagues, or Dr. Nabil Al-Tikriti, in the next few days, to explore the possibility of applying for a Fublright.

UMW graduates have won 19 Fulbright grants in the past decade. Past UMW students have won grants to teach English in Uruguay, Turkey, Thailand, Nepal, Mexico, and Korea; research water environment in South Africa, study the health effects of the Chernobyl disaster in Ukraine; research the effects of the Euro on the Polish economy, study Balkan history in Macedonia; research the justice system in Cambodia; study the effects of climate change on Ecuador’s arachnid population; and research immigration patterns and security issues in the United Kingdom. You too can do it — you need only a good idea, a solid GPA, and strong recommendation letters.

Although grantees must have obtained their bachelor’s degree by the time of their award, students who are not graduating next year — as well as interested alumni — are also encouraged to attend this meeting because successful applications often require advance preparation. At the meeting Dr. Al-Tikriti will discuss strategies for successful applications.

Prior to attending Tuesday’s meeting, interested students are also encouraged to research the Fulbright website: http://us.fulbrightonline.org/home.html .

Spring 2017 Symposium – Friday, 4/28

History and American Studies Symposium
University of Mary Washington – Department of History & American Studies
Friday, April 28

SESSION ONE. 9 AM. MONROE 210 — Studies in a New Military History
Moderator: Bruce O’Brien

Joseph Sartori – “Oak Ridge, Tennessee: The Secret City”

Helen Salita. “The Struggle for Survival:  Food Production, Preservation, and Conservation in Great Britain During World War II”

Emma Olson – “‘A Fate Worse Than Death’: PTSD from the American Civil War to the Vietnam War”

 
SESSION TWO. 9 AM.  MONOROE 211 – Global Perspectives on 19th and 20th century History
Moderator: Krystyn Moon

Jonathon Baker – “A Case Study of Hong Xiuquan’s Narrative as Presented by Hong Rengan, Theodore Hamburg, and Reverend Issachar Jacox Roberts”

Anna Kumor – “Doomed If You Do, Doomed If You Don’t: The Division of Cyprus in the 1960s”

Miguel Perez – “Interpreting Films in Regard to Historical Narratives: John Woo and the Transfer of Sovereignty, 1985-1997”

 

SESSION THREE. 9 AM. MONROE 111 – Selected Studies: Blackfoot Residential Schools and Modern Environmentalism
Moderator: Jason Sellers

Kelly Leann Miller, “The Voices Behind the Blackfoot Residential Schools” (J. Sellers)

Nancy Milroy – “American Deathways and Modern Environmentalism: Reuniting the Human and Natural Worlds via the Social and Physical Processes of a ‘Green’ Death”

 

SESSION FOUR. 10 AM. MONROE 210 – Media, Race, and Gender
Moderator: Susan Fernsebner

Ruby Hunter-Sowers – “Examining “Traditional” Masculinity and Femininity as Constructed through an Analysis of All in the Family’s Archie and Edith Bunker”

Daniel R. Reschke – “Parental Advisory: Whiteness, Masculinity, and Class in Heavy Metal during the Reagan Administration”

Corey Cooney – “A Case Study on the Importance of Intersectional Representation in Steven Universe

 

SESSION FIVE. 10 AM. MONROE 211 – Unemployment and the Mines of West Virginia: U.S. Labor History
Moderator: Nabil Al-Tikriti

Christian Trout –  “Coxey’s Army: Press Portrayals of Unemployment in the Gilded Age”

Neal Fanning  – “Mother Jones: Ascension of a Labor Agitator”

 

SESSION SIX. 10 AM. MONROE 111 – “How does a… grow up to be a hero and a scholar?”: Leading Figures in History
Moderator: Porter Blakemore

Megan Joslin – “Polarizing Politician: The Political Development of Alexander Hamilton”

Megan Green – “Martin Van Buren and His Use of Organizational Politics”

Mary McDaniel Moncure-Williams (Mackie) – “A Study of the Reputation of George Washington”

 

SESSION SEVEN. 11:00 AM. MONROE 210 – Famine, Captivity Narratives, and Native American—Colonist Relations: Three Studies
Moderator: Will Mackintosh

Cody Nester – “Colonial Oversights: How Famine Happened in Early British America”

Casey Mocarski, “Native American and Colonist Relations in Early Jamestown, 1607-1622”

Robbie Pratt, “The Creation of Truth: A Study of Puritan Rhetoric in Captivity Narratives”

 
SESSION EIGHT. 11:OO AM. MONROE 211 – Ancient and Medieval European History
Moderator: Jeff McClurken

Cooper Stroh – “The Cause of Hannibal’s Defeat in the Second Punic War”
Daniel Hawkins – “The Unbreakable Steed: Saxon Resistance to Frankish Religious and Political Rule in the Early Middle Ages”

Caitlin Jane McDonough – “The Origins of Regulation of Sexuality in the Medieval Church”

 

SESSION NINE. 11:00 AM. MONROE 111 – The ‘Great War’ in Military History
Moderator: Claudine Ferrell

Nathan George – “The Russian Role in the Start of the Great War, The Summer of 1914”

Kelly Wesselman – “Frozen Down to the Core: The Battle of Sarıkamış, 1914-1915”

Jacob Carter – “Tankity, Tankity, Tankity: The Evolution of Armored Tactics, 1919-1943”


12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch Break

 

SESSION TEN. 1 PM. MONROE 210 – Bodies, Gender, and Texts in Early Modern England
Moderator: Will Mackintosh

Christine Ortiz – “Breastfeeding and Women in Seventeenth Century England”

James Stewart – “A Maternal Duty: Mothers as Educators in Seventeenth-Century England”

Lauren Rainford – “‘Miss’representations: Gender Expectations of Single Women in Early Modern English Pamphlets and Ballads”

 

SESSSION ELEVEN. 1:00 PM. MONROE 211 – Topics in U.S. History
Moderator: Susan Fernsebner

Kristopher Hiser – “Grounded Aspirations: The Freedmen’s Struggle for Independence from the Planter Land Monopoly”

Ian Scott Wilson – “How the Republicans Rose and Slayed Woodrow Wilson”

Kelsey Brey – “The Perfect Storm: 1930s Race and Gender Relations Engulf the Scottsboro Verdicts”

 

SESSION TWELVE. 1:00 PM. MONROE 111 – Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Gender, Conflict, and Cinema
Moderator: Nabil Al-Tikriti

Kellyn Staneart “Women’s Roles in the Wars of the Roses”

Leah Kacoyanis – “The Film Depictions of Anne Boleyn”

 

SESSION THIRTEEN 2 PM. MONROE 210 – Gender in Early Modern, Modern, and Contemporary Studies
Moderator: Allyson Poska

Philip Leonard – “The Role of Exercise in Health, Masculinity and Society in Early Modern Europe”

Leah Boehman – “Coeducation at the University of Mary Washington: The Transition and History”

Shanna Davidson – “In Her Shoes: An Analysis of the Effects and Shift of Media Portrayal of Women and Nike’s Progressive Advertising”

 
SESSION FOURTEEN. 2 PM. MONROE 211 – Topics in Religious History
Moderator: Bruce O’Brien

Max Starr – “The Culture of Conversion in Anglo-Scandinavian England”

Matthew Jaster – “The Effect of Conversion on Scandinavian Women”

Victoria Anderson – “Reconstructing Norse Belief Through the Eyes of Later Christians”

 
SESSION FIFTEEN. 2 PM. MONROE 111. Selected Papers: U.S. Civil War History and West Virginia’s War on Coal
Moderator: Erin Devlin

Kristin O’Connell – “Psychological Effects and Suicide During the Civil War: An Analysis of Western State Hospital”

Madison Scovell – “Not so Typical Southerners: The Blackford Family During the Civil War”

Joshua Kassabian – “Strikes in the Mines of West Virginia: The War on Coal”

Talking History: Dr. Porter Blakemore (4/17)

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